Do You Lean Coffee?

Have you ever used the Lean Coffee format for a meeting?   It’s a tool I’ve been so pleased to use in a variety of formats in recent years.  I’ve used it for governance meetings, team retrospectives, and open agenda meetings where there is no pre-existing agenda other than to do Lean Coffee.

What is the Lean Coffee format?

The following content is copied from http://leancoffee.org/  “Lean Coffee is a structured, but agenda-less meeting. Participants gather, build an agenda, and begin talking. Conversations are directed and productive because the agenda for the meeting was democratically generated.”

1. Set up a Personal Kanban

Simple Personal Kanban for Lean Coffee

In this Personal Kanban we have the items to discuss, what we are currently discussing, and the discussed columns.

This provides a structure for the conversation. Next we populate it

2. What to Discuss

A Populated Backlog for the Personal Kanban

People all get pads of post-it notes and a pen. They then start to add their topics for conversation into the “to discuss” column. These can be literally whatever people want to discuss or follow a theme. Right now, we want to encourage as many unique ideas as we can.

When the ideas start reach a certain point (an you’ll be the best judge of when that is), each topic gets a 1 to 2 sentence introduction. This way people know what to vote for.

3. Vote and Talk

Stockholm Late Night Lean Coffee

Each participant gets two votes. You can vote twice for the same thing or for two different topics. Simple put a dot on the sticky you are interested in. Tally the dots. Then you are ready to have a conversation.

The power here is that you now have a list of topics everyone at the table is interested in and is motivated to discuss for real.

End of content from leancoffee.org website.

Some benefits of using the Lean Coffee format:

  1. It’s highly collaborative!
  2. It supports the discipline of being a self organizing team.
  3. It helps to crowd-source the agenda. People have skin in the game because they got to vote about what is being discussed
  4. Time boxing helps to keep the meeting from getting stale and boring.
  5. The proof is in the pudding. Some of the best conversations I’ve every been a part of have been while using the Lean Coffee format.

Examples of when Lean Coffee may not be the best idea:

  1. You have a very specific agenda that needs to be adhered too.
  2. There’s only 2-3 participants in the meeting.
  3. You are talking with customers or the participants may have never heard of lean coffee.
  4. Your participants are knowingly “anti agile”.
  5. If you know the majority of the participants of the meeting are not typically not inclined to talk in a group. Dominating personalities will control the conversation and others could become bored and find it a waste of time. (with the right coaching this risk could be avoided)

Need more info still?  Here’s a great video showing a sample lean coffee meeting.

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How to measure success in an Agile organization

**Re-posted from https://www.slalom.com/thinking/how-to-measure-success-in-an-agile-organization where this article was originally published.

Any organization adopting Agile faces the challenge of figuring out how to measure success. “How will we report to executives?” and “How can we standardize reporting across multiple teams?” are some of the first—and most important—questions that pop up. Answering these questions without compromising the spirit of an Agile transformation is critical to adoption.

Why? Because every metric you put in place will generate some type of behavior, be it positive or negative. That’s why it’s imperative to exercise a vast amount of diligence when working to define your metrics.

In the world of Agile, success can look very different than it does in a traditional Waterfall, fixed-scope environment. One of the cornerstones of Agile is to work on what’s most important to the business and deliver value as soon as possible. Here’s an example: the team goes into a sprint or release and commits to completing five items. But after work begins, the team learns that the number-one priority will require much more work than expected due to new requirements or bugs discovered during development. Poor planning isn’t to blame; the team just has to make adjustments based on new information. Everyone agrees to focus on the number-one item to complete by the end of the sprint, leaving items 2-5 unfinished. They refocus, successfully complete item number one, and deliver it on time. But the team only delivers 20% of its expected scope at the end of the sprint.

To many Agile teams, this could be considered a complete success, because ultimately the percentage of original scope isn’t as critical as delivering on what’s most important. So in this scenario, the traditional measure of committed vs. completed can be a poor measuring stick.

Let’s look at what could happen if the success of this team was measured by what it completed. The team learns that good numbers are more important than delivering on the top priority. They then start padding their estimates to ensure that they have plenty of time to finish without any risk of backlash. Now you have valuable energy being wasted on navigating a process rather than getting things done. You’ve invited some of the more negative aspects of the Hawthorne Effect to come and run rampant on your project and team.

For an Agile organization to be successful, there has to be a general assumption that people are working hard and want to do their best. The role of a good leader is to enable teams to work smarter, not harder.

Here are seven traditional and not-so-traditional ways to measure the success of your Agile team.

1. Measure teams rather than individuals. A study conducted by Team Builders Plus found that “individual performance data are of less value (judging from the ratings and number of organizations tracking it) while team data reinforces collaboration and problem solving.” Collaboration is a key part of any Agile team that focuses efforts on the outcome of a project rather than a single person’s output.

2. Keep track of the percentage of the highest priority items being delivered. If your team’s focus is on delivering what is most important first, you can keep track of this trend over time. If the team is always delivering on priority two and three, but missing number one, you can use it as a coaching opportunity to help increase collaboration.

3. Measure the team’s satisfaction. You can be leading a team that is delivering at a high level, but if they’re miserable, you’re in a dangerous place. Part of a team’s success is the overall satisfaction of its members.

4. Evaluate your software. There isn’t a universal solution for determining if you have “working software.” Some of this relates back to customer satisfaction, but you could also measure if the work being done is truly solving problems—or if, in fact, it’s creating more.

5. Show the business value delivered. This may require more work up front, but if you have an idea of the value for a particular story or project, you can tell the story of the value that was delivered.

6. Provide a narrative, not just data. Why spend time collecting, packaging, and sharing data that really has no bearing on a team’s success? Sometimes even providing 3-4 sentences can give much more useful information than a pie chart. Visualization of data is definitely a good thing, but think carefully before defaulting to visualizations.

7. Measure anything the business says is important. Easier said than done, but as a guiding principal, focus on what the customer is saying is important. If they only care about 2-3 things, why give them 15?

Now you’ve got the metrics, but what do you do when ground forces at the executive level are resistant to Agile? First off, don’t react when people are critical or have a different perspective about what should be measured. You’ll be more successful showing people how Agile can enable the metrics they want.

Of course, there’s still a chance you won’t be able to reconcile the expanse between the pro-Agile and anti-Agile parties. In VersionOne’s annual Agile survey, 53% of people said an organization’s inability to change its culture was a barrier to adoption. There’s no silver bullet here. Another revealing statistic from that same survey was that 35% said trying to fit Agile into a non-Agile framework was a barrier to adoption. The research speaks for itself:you can’t always expect the metrics that work for a Waterfall project to apply to an Agile project.

The workplace is full of spreadsheets and databases, amassing ever-increasing amounts of information. With that, the definition of success—specifically in information technology-centric groups—has changed dramatically over the last 10 years. I’m a firm believer that success in its purest form can be measured by how happy your customer base is with the product or service you provide for them. That’s why the Agile Manifesto emphasizes “individuals and interactions over processes and tools.”

Brainstorming, Story Boarding, and Retrospective Tool – IdeaBoardz

This week I was talking with some fellow colleagues about starting a Lean Coffee for our organization.  We have a national (soon to be international) footprint and a ton of knowledge out there, but how to bring it together?  So I thought the lean coffee meetings would be a great way to bring people together to inspire, encourage, equip, and empower each other. It could also create a consistent venue where we can work together to solve challenges for our clients.

I had a few different people suggest using a tool called IdeaBoardz.  I want to share this tool not only because think it will be great for Lean Coffee but it has value for things like brainstorming, story boarding, and retrospectives.  Especially if you have co-located teams.

It’s simple to use and has just enough functionality to make it useful. And best of all…it’s Free!

You can take it for a test drive without having to sign in or create an account.

IdeaBoardz

Please Note I am in no way affiliated with IdeaBoardz and receive no compensation for writing this article.

MBP #1: Become More Agile By Doing Less

Micro Blog Post #1:

Capture

What Is An Agile Process? An agile process is simply ANY process that adheres to the principles of the agile manifesto. When the founders of the Agile Manifesto got together to create it and the principles, they asked what they were doing right. When working to continually improve do not simply focus on what where you need to improve. But look at what you are doing right and try to do more of that. Keep it simple and your agile teams will flourish. Becoming more agile doesn’t necessarily mean introducing more processes, it could just be focusing more intently on what is working.  Who knows, maybe you can become more agile by doing less.

Stay Agile My Friends

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This is mostly meant to give you a chuckle, but there is some validity to it as well.  In my last blog post I talked about how we need to challenge the limits of what we understand agile to be.  Can you be agile and waterfall at the same time?  Probably not if you look through the lenses of what we typically view as a waterfall process.  But it’s possible.

One thing I’ve noticed as an agile coach is that people like to gravitate towards what they know and are more comfortable with.  One way this can play out is when helping a team adopt agile, you can get a strong pull to keeping things in the box of a waterfall process. This happens both at the individual contributor level and management level. Management can sometimes want waterfall type metrics but without the changes needed to realize the true benefits of agile. It’s ok though.  Be patient, and see if you can find a way to meet somewhere in the middle. Waterfall isn’t bad.  In fact it has tremendous value in the right context.  So, as an agile enthusiast make sure you aren’t always negative about waterfall especially when it could be used to your advantage.  However, what you don’t want to do is fall into the trap of using the buzz words from agile/scrum but keeping things pretty much the same.

I’ve found it is helpful to ask people questions about why they want to do something a certain way. “What do you think will be the benefits of trying it this way?” “What are you hoping to accomplish by doing it this way vs. that way?” If you say things like “You are just stuck in old thinking.” or “That’s not agile.” you can build walls instead of creating bridges. If they are pushing for trying something, maybe just go with it for 1-2 sprints.  Then evaluate the impact it is having.  After all, I’ve always found that I am continually learning from the teams I work with, and surprise-surprise I DON’T KNOW EVERYTHING!  😉

Apology to the internet and an intro to the blog

Dear internet and devoted bloggers, I’m sorry.  I occasionally write some blog posts on my personal blog, but for the most part I’ve been one of those who consumes but doesn’t contribute.  Have you ever thought while searching for something “I really should be one of the people that posts helpful information on the internet and not just the one who searches for it.” ???  Well…I have too, for many years, and that’s part of why I am starting this blog.

I’m a project manager in the Seattle area working at a consulting firm.  In recent years I’ve been working with agile team more and more, and know I’ll have some information others might find useful. I’ve developed such a strong interest in agile/scrum that I’m going to get of my keyboard butt and write!

I’ll be posting about practical everyday tips for agile teams, my experiences with different training resources, agile memes and will even have guest bloggers from time to time.  Hopefully we can keep a lighthearted and humorous approach to solving real business problem.

Thanks for stopping by The AgileSphere!

-Chris